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Extend Coolant Life with Cost-Effective Coolant Skimmer | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Mar 26, 2021 9:30:00 AM

A coolant skimmer is a machine that removes floating oil and grease from liquid. The floating oil adheres to skimming media, such as a belt, tube, or disk. The media then runs back to the machine to be wiped clean.

Coolant skimmers are simple, dependable and effective tools for removing oil, grease and other hydrocarbons from water and coolants. Often, a coolant skimmer by itself can achieve the desired level of water purity.

In more demanding situations, coolant skimming is a cost-effective means of removing most of the oil before using more complicated and costly treatments such as coalescers, membrane filters and chemical processes.

Coolants And Cutting Fluids

When machine coolants become contaminated with tramp oils, four things usually occur:

  • coolant life is reduced;
  • quality of machined parts is reduced;
  • in many cases, a smoke will begin to appear in the shop, causing irritation to the workers on the job; and
  • the fluid takes on a “rotten egg” odor.

Oil skimmers that remove tramp oils solve these problems and typically pay for themselves within a few months. Therefore, these are the coolant skimmers you should remember to extend the life of your coolant.

Oil Boss (New Generation Oil Skimmer)

Abanaki's Oil Boss is an innovative tool for keeping coolant free of oil. The patent-pending design allows for easy visual inspection of your coolant’s condition; and will also help extend tool and coolant life. It will decrease loss of production and maintenance time. And it will allow for easy cleaning of various sumps or tanks around any plant or shop due to its portability and magnetic base. The Oil Boss has a small footprint that reduces the amount of clutter and equipment on the shop floor.

Mighty Disk (Disk oil Skimmer)

Mighty Disk is the inexpensive way to remove unwanted tramp oils from coolants and parts washers, but with all the quality that you expect from Abanaki! Removes up to 1 ½ gallons of oil or more of medium weight oil per hour. Use it almost anywhere a flat surface is available for mounting. Weighs less than 10 pounds, installs in no time, and runs on 110v power.

TubeTastic (Tube Oil Skimmer)

The Abanaki TubeTastic! oil skimmer can be used on machining centers with little or no access to the coolant sump from above. This unit can skim oil from chip conveyors or even totally enclosed machining centers. The TubeTastic! can be easily mounted on the side of virtually any machining center coolant sump. By use of an existing opening or by making a small access cutout, the collector tube runs through the surface of the coolant and collects the unwanted oils. The oil then flows out the discharge tube into any waste oil container for easy disposal.

Mighty Mini (Belt Oil Skimmer)

The stainless steel Mighty Mini is a compact belt skimmer designed for parts washers and machine tool coolant sumps. With its large discharge trough and small operating space, the Mighty Mini fits almost anywhere. The stainless steel construction resists rust and corrosion in harsh environments. It is lightweight and requires minimal assembly. With its durable stainless steel construction, it is built to give long lasting performance. The removable trough makes cleanup fast and easy.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


HOW TO TELL WHAT SKIMMER YOU NEED FOR YOUR MACHINE COOLANT

Have you ever looked at your coolant and wondered what type skimmer would work best in your machine sump? In this video, we talk about what oil skimmer works well in various coolant applications.

Read More

Topics: oil skimmers, belt skimmer, oil skimming, petroxtractor, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

Facts About Oil Skimming System Designs: Part 1| Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Dec 16, 2020 11:15:00 AM

Oil skimmers usually incur a low initial cost, install easily, offer rugged construction, reliable operation and minimal upkeep. Training personnel for operation, monitoring and routine maintenance is nil.

Still, there are different types of skimmers, and each application requires some analysis to make the best selection. Also, the water collection system must be set up properly in order to get maximum performance from the skimmer.

Reservoir Design

Because skimming acts on floating oil, the water must be in a reservoir where separation can occur. The reservoir should be designed with quiet areas, weirs and sufficient volume to allow adequate residence time for oil/water separation. Avoid turbulence by having water return to the reservoir below the liquid surface at as low a velocity as practical. Tanks without nooks and crannies for oil to accumulate in are best.

If you have an irregular shape, put the skimmer where the largest amount of oil accumulates. Consider a means of directing oil toward the skimmer medium to improve removal efficiency.

Turbulence

All skimmers work more efficiently in quiet water with a relatively thick oil layer. The greater the turbulence, the lower their efficiency due to emulsification. Turbulence also affects the physical performance of a skimmer. For example, a tube-shaped medium may get kinked due to turbulence, which could cause damage or impair its drive mechanism.

Mop type oil skimmers may require a tail pulley with its axle secured to the side of the tank. Belt types may be fitted with a tether or stabilizer bar assembly to resist twisting of the tail pulley.

Skimmer Reliability and Maintenance

Skimmers require a certain amount of routine maintenance, primarily periodic cleaning and checking wiper blade adjustment. Easy removal of safety covers shielding the moving medium and its pulleys will reduce maintenance time.

In terms of drive designs, those with separate gear reducers tend to be somewhat more robust than unitary gear motor drives. Chain drives, which are found on a few models, need to be lubricated regularly and the chain should be protected from debris and other impediments.

Installing an Oil Skimmer

The biggest installation issues are the amount of space required and cost. With regards to space, there are two areas that need to be considered: mounting area and water surface area. Installation of a suction skimmer also may involve sensors and a control box.

Moving medium skimmers require some sort of rigid mount on or near the reservoir. Some require the drilling of holes into the tank, which can be costly, depending on the reservoir design. Because of drive design, drum types tend to require more elaborate mounting methods and space. Belt, disk, tube and mop drive units consume a moderate amount of space.

An advantage of some belt skimmer drives is the use of a flat surface mount or bracket, neither of which require tank modifications. Mounting stands, brackets and adapters help make skimmer installations easier and faster.

Portability is a plus in some applications. For example, in plants and mobile equipment service shops, a portable skimmer can sometimes service both a parts washer and a drain water retention sump.

Belt and disk type skimmers tend to be the best designs for portability, and can be made small enough to weigh only a few pounds.

As most hydrocarbons spread fairly quickly over the top of water, it is not necessary to use more of the surface than the skimmer medium contact area. However, a skimmer’s design may actually take up more of the surface than the minimum required. A drum skimmer may require up to five square feet depending on drum size.

A tube skimmer requires four to five square feet due to the tube snaking out over the surface of the liquid. Unless a mop medium is constrained by a tail pulley, it moves around and takes up surface real estate. This is particularly true when there is turbulence.

Disk skimmers generally require from one-half to one square foot of liquid area.

Belt skimmers require from a few square inches to about one square foot, which is determined by the belt width and diameter of the tail pulley.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Abanaki Model 8 Belt Skimmer in Operation

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Topics: oil skimmers, belt skimmer, oil skimming, petroxtractor, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

7 Common Mistakes That Lead to the Wrong Oil Skimmer | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 31, 2020 9:30:00 AM

Selecting an oil skimmer can be a complex decision-making process. There are various factors you have to consider about your application when choosing the right skimmer. Here is a guide to help you avoid the 7 common mistakes that are made when purchasing an oil skimmer.

Under-Sizing Your Skimmer

A common misconception is that you can buy a smaller skimmer based on
gallons-per-hour skimming capacity for a big job to save money. However,
purchasing a small or mini unit instead of an industrial sized skimmer can be an ineffective method of oil skimming. Oil skimmers should be selected by the size of the area that needs to be skimmed, not just by the amount of oil needing to be removed.

Improper Placement of Oil Skimmers

Planning is important! Before spending money on a concrete pad and mounting arrangements, check where the oil actually collects in your process. Oil skimmers should be located opposite from the inflow and the tail pulley should be submerged two inches below the surface of the liquid in order to be as effective as possible.

Paying for a Complicated Solution

Oil skimming usually beats ultra-filtration systems in many applications. More often than not, installing large, complicated systems to remedy oil problems will not provide ideal results. You can save costs by using a relatively inexpensive oil skimming system to handle the free-floating oil and then a smaller treatment system to handle the oil that has remained suspended in the wastewater.

Not Telling Your Consultant or Vendor Everything

Oil skimmer selection can be a very complex process. There are numerous factors that go into selecting the right oil skimmer for your particular application. If the oil skimmer vendor does not know what chemicals or heat you have in your application, the wrong oil skimmer and belt materials could be selected, and the job will not get done correctly.

Choosing the Wrong Oil Skimming Material

There are several things to consider when choosing a belt or tube material for your oil skimmer. Some plastics will not stand up to heat or strong chemicals. Certain metal belts will not skim coolants effectively. Smooth belts do no pick up floating emulsified oils. Specific plastic belts do not last in heated applications, while other types of plastic belts will.

Lack of Maintenance and Basic Care

An oil skimmer will only remove oil if it is properly maintained. There are basic maintenance tasks that should be done regularly to keep your oil skimmer up to snuff. Are the wipers contacting the belt smoothly? Is the belt riding away from the sides of the pulley? Are the troughs and wipers clear of debris?

Buying from an Unknown Vendor Based on Price

Like most things in life, you get what you pay for. Buying from small, unheard of oil skimmer manufacturers will probably result in no customer support when maintenance issues pop up and little to no knowledge of how to resolve those issues. Furthermore, parts will need to be replaced over time, units might have to be changed or upgraded, or different belt materials need to be used. Disreputable vendors typically do not have a selection of materials or parts to choose from.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


HOW TO TELL WHAT SKIMMER YOU NEED FOR YOUR MACHINE COOLANT

Have you ever looked at your coolant and wondered what type skimmer would work best in your machine sump? In this video, we talk about what oil skimmer works well in various coolant applications.

Read More

Topics: oil skimmers, belt skimmer, oil skimming, petroxtractor, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

Oil Skimming: What is a DNAPL? | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 29, 2020 2:00:00 PM

DNAPL is short for dense non-aqueous phase liquid. Common DNAPLs include creosote, coal tar, and heavy oils; common DNAPL applications include degreasing and acting as a solvent. On the other hand, DNAPLs can also be the byproduct of industrial processes; in particular, a form of DNAPL known as multi-compound waste is a common type of waste oil. The defining aspect of DNAPLs, density, causes the mixture to sink in liquids like water or coolant. Because the sludge sinks, surface skimmers like rope skimmers have issues treating DNAPLs. Additionally, the density tends to cause problems with devices requiring a pump for collections because of its density, clogging the pipe or even breaking the pump itself.

Why are DNAPLs a Problem?

DNAPLs are common forms of wastewater pollution. Having DNAPLs leak into local groundwater is a violation of EPA regulations. In addition, DNAPLs can worsen working conditions in manufacturing. Often, these oils will emit a smell akin to sulfur as they break down.

DNAPLs may also reduce the effectiveness of machinery. The density can interfere with pumps or other methods of liquid conveyance, while the chemical properties of the DNAPL, depending on composition, can have adverse effects on the liquid it is suspended in.

These problems can actively interfere with the intended function of the machinery, leading to productivity loss or even damage to the machine.

How are DNAPLs Collected?

For DNAPLS, there are two general means of treatment: extraction and destruction. Extraction denotes the removal of the DNAPL from the liquid, while destruction means breaking down or neutralizing the DNAPLs to a level of minimal impact.

Methods of treatment include bioremediation, in situ methods like oxidation, reduction and flushing, barriers, soil vapor extraction (abbreviated as SVE) and air sparging, solidification and stabilization, pump and treat, and excavation. Skimmers are often used as supplements for in situ methods like flushing to hasten the removal of free-floating DNAPLs.  

Belt Oil Skimmers are the Best Method?

Belt oil skimmers can be an effective means of DNAPL treatment. Having an oleophilic belt gives the belt oil skimmer an inherent way to attract floating oils and emulsified fluids without relying on pumps or other like means. In addition, a belt oil skimmer like the PetroXtractor requires far less daily maintenance than pumps or other means of collection.

When pumps break down from clogs or internal mechanical failures, additional time is needed to correctly assess the problem and repair the problem. The pump also collects excess water, which is expected to be pumped back in the well and adds extra cost. Oil skimmers circumvent these problems.

The streamlined design of the PetroXtractor makes for easy assessment and repair in case of malfunction. Belt oil skimmers do not face the same clogging issues pumps do simply because there is almost nothing to clog.

Upkeep is straightforward and easy on a skimmer, often requiring a visit only once a week. The design of the PetroXtractor focuses on the collection of LNAPLs and DNAPLs without collecting water, preventing excess fluid from being collected. The PetroXtractor also can operate in fluctuating water levels as well as in more extreme conditions that pumps may have issues handling.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


 

How Does a Well Oil Skimmer Work? | Abanaki

This animated demo shows how the PetroXtractor well oil skimmer works great with a large vertical drop making it ideal for wells and other small openings. Depths of 100 feet or more can be handled without the use of pumps.

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Topics: oil skimmers, belt skimmer, oil skimming, petroxtractor, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

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