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9 Ways to Treat DNAPLs | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 17, 2021 11:15:00 AM

Difficult to remove and dangerous to the health of the environment and humans, DNAPLs are a persistent thorn in the side for many areas. Still, there are many ways to treat DNAPLs; the key is to find the correct method for the individual site.

What is a DNAPL?

DNAPL is short for dense non-aqueous phase liquid. Common DNAPLs include creosote, coal tar, and heavy oils; common DNAPL applications include degreasing and acting as a solvent. On the other hand, DNAPLs can also be the byproduct of industrial processes; in particular, a form of DNAPL known as multi-compound waste is a common type of waste oil.

Which method is best for Treating DNAPLs?

Each of the following methods have their advantages and disadvantages. The conditions present in each treatment site determine the effectiveness and cost of individual methods and is the largest factor in choosing treatment method. As such, a good working knowledge of the treatment site is key to effective remediation.

Excavation

Excavation, where an environmental remediation firm will dig to the DNAPL and remove the pollutant, is by far the most effective method and has close to 100% efficiency. Excavation is also expensive and impractical, since the DNAPLs are often deep underground and require significant amounts of manpower and machinery to reach the aquifer.

Bioremediation

Bioremediation is a much more common method. By introducing or encouraging the growth of organisms that can digest the DNAPL, bioremediation breaks down the pollutant into ecologically friendly substances. Bioremediation not only treats the DNAPL effectively, but can also potentially treat other pollutants in the remediation area and does not require the removal of waste.

Belt skimmers

Belt skimmers can be an effective means of DNAPL treatment. Having an oleophilic belt gives the belt oil skimmer an inherent way to attract floating oils and emulsified fluids without relying on pumps or other like means. In addition, a belt oil skimmer like the PetroXtractor requires far less daily maintenance than pumps or other means of collection.

Air sparging

Air sparging involves pumping pressurized air into the groundwater, causing the hydrocarbons in the water to become a gas. This gas is then sucked up by vacuum extraction. Air sparging is unable to function with low air permeability and functions inefficiently when the air permeability is too high.

Soil vapor extraction

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is similar to air sparging, but focuses on removing contaminants from the surrounding soil rather than groundwater. As such, the technique shares may of its advantages and disadvantages with air sparging. Both techniques are focused on environmental remediation; although some industrial processes may be able to accommodate air sparging, most will find the introduction of gas into a potentially polluted tank will propagate foul smells and potentially harmful gases.

Solidification

Solidification involves immobilizing the contaminant via chemical or physical means. Often, this method relies on trapping contaminants in soil, either reducing contamination of the aquifer or making the contaminant easier to remove. Inorganic pollutants, such as radionuclides, can be collected more easily and with fewer health risks like radiation poisoning.

In situ oxidation

In situ oxidation involves the injection of chemical oxidizers, materials such as oxygen or the halogen family that encourage the loss of electrons, into the contaminated area. The chemical reaction between the chemical oxidizer and the pollutant renders the pollutant harmless. Often, oxidation is used for chemical pollutants. Oxidation still needs to react with the substance; if the pollutant is not easily oxidized, the treatment will have no effect.

In-situ chemical reduction

In-situ chemical reduction is similar in concept to In-situ oxidation. Usually used to treat chromium and the solvent trichloroethene, the method introduces a reducing agent such as zero-valent iron nanoparticles to reduce the number of electrons in a contaminant and change the contaminant to something less harmful.

Pump and treat

Pump and treat refers to the process of pumping out the groundwater from the aquifer and subsequently treating that groundwater through any number of means, including most of the methods listed above. Pumping out the water makes the water easier to treat since the conditions can be adjusted for better collection and the aquifer may not be suited to the optimal method of remediation.

Collecting DNAPLs can be a difficult task but is possible with enough foresight and planning. By understanding the nature of the contamination and the unique environment the treatment occurs in, an effective treatment method can be selected.



To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com



How Does a Well Oil Skimmer Work? 

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Topics: groundwater remediation, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

Oil Skimmers Suitability for Outdoor Application | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 31, 2021 11:00:00 AM

In outdoor applications, the use of heaters may be required to keep skimmed product fluid so it can be effectively removed from the medium and collection tray. This is particularly true for grease skimming, which involves higher viscosity at all temperatures. Polymer materials are limited in their heat tolerance, so oil skimmers equipped with these media may have only tray heaters.

Oil Skimmers Accessories

Oil skimmers with steel media can apply heat to both the tray and the medium, which improves performance in severe winter climates. To resist corrosion, a stainless-steel housing also may be needed. Above ground enclosures and underground manway mounting kits provide additional protection from the elements.

Commonly used materials for wiper blades are nitrile, [CRV] and ceramics. Nitrile is suitable for use as high as 176° F in neutral pH liquids. For higher temperatures and acidic or alkaline liquids, [CRV] wipers work well. Ceramics are resistant to more chemicals, but are prone to breakage.

For hazardous duty locations with ignitable fumes, explosion-proof motors are mandatory. Special corrosion resistant motor housings may be required for sanitary washdown situations in food plants. Different voltages and power frequencies are needed for some plants.

In many applications, oil skimmers can run unattended for days or weeks. This is typical for groundwater remediation applications at remote well sites. When controls are used, they tend to be either manual on/off switches or 24-hour timers to start and stop the unit at predetermined times.

Oil Skimmer Reliability and Maintenance

Oil skimmers require a certain amount of routine maintenance, primarily periodic cleaning and checking wiper blade adjustment. Easy removal of safety covers shielding the moving medium and its pulleys will reduce maintenance time.

In terms of drive designs, those with separate gear reducers tend to be somewhat more robust than unitary gear motor drives. Chain drives, which are found on a few models, need to be lubricated regularly and the chain should be protected from debris and other impediments.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Abanaki Model 8 Belt Skimmer in Operation

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Topics: industrial oil Skimmers, industrial wastewater, Ground Remediation

Oil Skimming for Wastewater Recycling | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 26, 2021 3:45:00 PM

As large generators of oily wastewater tighten effluent controls, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is targeting smaller generators. Some of the firms receiving their attention are smaller manufacturing plants, automotive garages, mobile equipment service shops and truck farms. Many of these firms do not have access to a sanitary sewer system that will accept oily wastewater.

Because disposal in storm sewers also is prohibited, they frequently use injection wells, septic system drain-fields, dry wells and ground pits to dispose of oily wastewater; one EPA concern is that oily wastewater will find its way into an underground aquifer that is a source of drinking water.

Many oily wastes contain organic and inorganic chemicals in concentrations that exceed the primary drinking water standards established by the Safe Drinking Water Act. So, the focus of one EPA program is aimed at preventing contamination of groundwater by controlling oily wastewater recycling at the generator’s site.

Getting Rid of Oily Wastewater

If oily wastewater isn’t recycled, it must be disposed of safely. One option is to have it collected and hauled away by a licensed disposal firm. The annual volume of oily wastewater generated by many shops and plants makes hauling too costly.

Even firms connected to sanitary or industrial wastewater sewer systems have limitations on the oil content in their effluent. When oil concentration exceeds a certain level, usually 100 ppm or less, the generator can get hit with hefty surcharges by the local government providing wastewater treatment.

At some level of oil concentration, the oily water effluent is prohibited from entering the sanitary sewer line.

Wastewater Recycling

With wastewater recycling, the most common methods of oil/water separation include decanting tanks, oil skimming, coalescing, membrane separation and various chemical treatments. Any of these methods can be effective. Selection should be based on economic as well as technical considerations.

Although it is a cost-effective method of reducing contamination, oil skimming often is overlooked as a primary technique. Frequently, this results from the misperception that skimming is only suitable as a pretreatment ahead of other oil/water separation devices.

Certainly, skimming is a retreatment method used to prevent oil overloads in downstream membranes, coalescers and sand bed filters. But it can stand alone as an oil removal method in many applications, reducing oil to only a few parts per million concentrations, depending on conditions. In many locales, this is good enough to allow the water to enter a sanitary sewer system without paying connection surcharges.

More exotic methods of oil removal, such as membrane filtration and chemical treatment, are most often required when tight emulsions and other chemicals must be removed. If an emulsion is the water-in-oil type, a skimmer may do the job.

Types of Oil Skimmers

Oil skimmers usually incur a low initial cost, install easily, offer rugged construction, reliable operation and minimal upkeep. Training personnel for operation, monitoring and routine maintenance is nil.

Still, there are different types of skimmers, and each application requires some analysis to make the best selection. Also, the water collection system must be set up properly in order to get maximum performance from the skimmer.

The six major skimmer configurations for industrial plants and service shops are belt, disk, drum, mop, tube and floating suction types. For all types, the oil or other hydrocarbon liquids must be floating on top of the water. For all but the floating suction type, a moving skimmer medium is pulled through or across the surface to attract the oil.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com



You are just one step away from downloading Abanaki's most detailed resource on our oil skimming equipment. Simply click at the button to get your ultimate guide now.

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Topics: oil skimming, industrial wastewater, wastewater recycling

Rescue Your Coolant with Abanaki’s Oil Boss Coolant Skimmer | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jul 30, 2021 9:14:34 AM

Coolant skimmers typically don’t come attached to CNC machines when they are newly bought. This is because nobody wants to admit that the brand-new machine is eventually going to leak oil into the coolant. This looks good on paper, but there is a reason why so many coolant skimmers are bought annually. CNC machines are bound to have at least a small amount of oil leaking into the coolant at some point. The skimmer will remove this oil from the top of the coolant for disposal. Without some type of coolant skimmer, the coolant life will be dramatically decreased. These small coolant skimmers will save you money throughout the operational life of your CNC machine. 

Coolant skimmers can really help in extending the life of your costly coolant. Coolant skimmers help remove oils that leak from machines or parts to keep your coolant clean. By removing the oil with coolant skimmer, you can significantly increase the life of your coolant. 

So, is your product quality being affected by floating oil? Have you asked yourself how you remove oil from water effectively and efficiently?

Abanaki’s Oil Boss Oil Skimmer

One of the best coolant skimmers of Abanaki coolant maintenance line is Abanaki’s Oil Boss Oil Skimmer. This high-capacity unit constantly removes and discharges unwanted oil from the coolant that is compromising your product quality, reducing your coolant life, and stinking up the shop. The unit uses a specially designed “Constant Flow Facilitator” that automatically discharges the tramp oil skimmed from the coolant. The “Constant Flow Facilitator” eliminates the need to manually remove the collect oil. 

Benefits of Oil Boss Oil Skimmer

We have been providing oil skimmers for years to machine shops and manufacturers across the globe and they have proven to be both reliable and cost-effective. Abanaki's Oil Boss is an innovative tool for keeping coolant free of oil. The patent-pending design allows for easy visual inspection of your coolant’s condition; and will also help extend tool and coolant life. It will decrease loss of production and maintenance time. And it will allow for easy cleaning of various sumps or tanks around any plant or shop due to its portability and magnetic base. The Oil Boss has a small footprint that reduces the amount of clutter and equipment on the shop floor.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Watch this video to see how to remove a higher amount of tramp oil.

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Topics: coolant maintenance, coolant skimmer, oil boss oil skimmer

How Oil Water Concentrator Increases Oil Skimmer Efficiency? | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jul 26, 2021 2:37:22 PM

If you are running your skimmer 24/7 and the tank or pit runs out of oil, your skimmer will pick up whatever is remaining in the tank, and most of the time that will be water or coolant. There is a way to prevent this and that is by utilizing an oil water separator/concentrator in conjunction with your oil skimmer.

Oil Water Concentrator

The oil water concentrator attaches to the skimmer and helps in further separating the water/coolant from your oil. This unit is placed on the back of the skimmer. The skimmed material is drained into the concentrator and then it separates the water from oil. You can then drain the water back into the tank or well through one hose, and the oil drains from another. So, next time you’re wondering how to increase the efficiency of your oil skimmer, take a look at the oil water concentrator to help solve your dilemma. 

How Oil Water Concentrator works?

The Oil Concentrator is non-electrical and contains no moving parts — it simply receives liquid directly from the skimmer. Based on the principle of gravity separation, the Concentrator tank is sized so that there is adequate dwell time for the oil and water to separate. Water discharge is through a tube that has an open end near the bottom of the Concentrator, while oil flow is through a separate drain port near the top. As additional liquid enters the Concentrator, water and oil are forced out through their respective discharge tubes and ports. A sludge screen provides additional dwell time for separation while preventing debris from contaminating either the water or the oil.

Abanaki Oil Concentrator

The Abanaki Oil Concentrator provides virtually complete oil/ water separation for recycling or disposal of either liquid. Under most operating conditions, Abanaki skimmers pick up oil with only small traces of water. However, as surface oil is reduced to a thin layer (1/16 inch thick or less), more water (or coolant) may be picked up along with the oil. When used in tandem with an oil skimmer, the Oil Concentrator solves this problem by providing final phase separation. The result is water (or coolant) available for recycling, and virtually water-free oil for disposal.

Installed at the discharge end of the oil skimmer, the Concentrator comes complete with mounting bracket, removable sludge screen and drain plug for easy cleaning. An optional thermostatically controlled heater is available for use with thick oils, or when the application is in freezing temperatures. (A heater should not be used in environments where explosive fumes might be present.)

Abanaki recommends the use of the Concentrator with all oil skimmers. It increases the efficiency of the skimmer and reduces costs associated with oil disposal.



To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com



HOW TO TELL WHAT SKIMMER YOU NEED FOR YOUR MACHINE COOLANT

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Topics: oil concentrator, coolant maintenance, oil water separator

Industrial Wastewater Skimmers for Steel Mills | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 29, 2021 10:24:17 AM

Abanaki offers industrial wastewater skimmers specially designed for steel mills where plant maintenance engineers are looking for the lowest cost, most reliable method of removing greases and heavy oils from the steel-mill scale pit. Abanaki oil skimmers use the difference in specific gravity and surface tension between grease and water, allowing the belt to attract grease and oil as the belt passes through the surface of the water. The simple belt-and-motor approach is proven to operate unattended and reliably for decades with little maintenance.

Grease Grabber Oil Skimmer

To avoid fines from government and municipal sewer districts, steel mills must limit the amount of grease in wastewater discharged into the environment. The Grease Grabber® oil and grease skimmer provides a continuously operating belt and wiper that can remove up to 160 gallons per hour of heavy greases and oils. Depending on the characteristics of the liquid, the oil/grease skimmer is capable of reducing grease content to fewer than five parts-per-million in water. Reclaimed grease and oil can be re-used or used as furnace fuel, avoiding sucker truck disposal costs.

How Grease Skimmer Works?

Using a double drive roller and tail pulley system, the grease skimmer belt runs through wastewater to pick up grease and heavy oil from the surface. The belt travels over the head pulley and then passes through tandem wiper blades, from which oil is scraped off both sides and discharged. A heated hopper keeps grease flowing in cold outdoor temperatures.

The tail pulley features flanges that allow the pulley to roll freely on the inside of the belt without becoming dislodged in turbulent applications. No bearings are needed; the unit does not need to be fastened to the tank. An optional tether and cage assembly is offered to prevent the tail pulley from being dislodged. The Grease Grabber oil skimmer can be used in pits with depths as shallow as one foot or as deep as 100 feet.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Abanaki Model 8 Belt Skimmer in Operation

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Topics: steel mills, industrial wastewater, grease skimmer

Oil Skimming is the Most Effective Solution to Refineries | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 23, 2021 10:14:54 AM

Refineries are capable of producing gasoline, jet fuel, or even asphalt and, like most large-scale high-capacity plants, require process optimization and advanced process controls.

Oil Skimming Solution

Oil skimming is a popular method for capturing and removing oil from wastewater in plant treatment systems. This process is mandatory to avoid fines and to produce fuel as economically and environmentally friendly as possible. Oil skimmers work by making use of the differences in specific gravity and surface tension between oil and water. These physical characteristics allow the belts to attract oil and other hydrocarbon liquids from the surface of the fluid.

By implementing an oil skimming solution, the goal to recapture 100% of all hydrocarbons before they go down the drain, can be achieved. The oil skimmer collects the bulk of the hydrocarbons and sends them back to a crude tank. Any residual oils can be removed through filtration or chemical treatment. The oil skimmer is operated 24 hours a day 7 days a week. A refinery oil skimmer requires very little oversight, no maintenance, and the time saved more than offsets the electrical costs.

Abanaki Oil Skimmers

The Model 8 oil skimmer is the most widely used Abanaki oil skimmer. Its size and removal capacity make it suitable for most applications. From a mere shimmer on top of water to a heavy oil slick, the Model 8 oil skimmer performs efficiently, removing up to 40 gallons of oil per hour.

The Abanaki Model MB oil skimmer is a dependable and effective means of removing oil from water and water-base solutions. Often, oil skimming by itself will reduce oil to an acceptable level of water purity. Depending on the characteristics of the liquid, it is possible for the Model MB alone to reduce oil content to less than five parts per million in water. The unit can be used as a pretreatment before filtration, and in conjunction with a coalescing system.

The Model 4 oil skimmer utilizes a continuous belt and wiper to remove up to 20 gallons of oil per hour from the fluid surface. Depending on the characteristics of the liquid, it is possible for the Model 4 alone to reduce oil content to less than five parts per million in water.

 The Abanaki Oil Viper tube skimmer is a surface oil skimmer that effectively removes floating surface oils by means of an oleophilic (oil attracting) 3/4 inch diameter continuous looped tube. The tube extends out over the surface of the tank or pit and collects the free-floating oils. The Oil Viper has a specially designed method for removing the oil from the tube. It has a unique wiper combination attached to the tube itself in addition to the ceramic wiper on the skimmer.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Oil Skimmers Get the Dirty Jobs Done

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Topics: groundwater remediation, refinery, industrial wastewater

Oil Skimmers for Hydroelectric Power Plants | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 28, 2021 11:45:00 AM

Small leaks of hydraulic oil from turbines at hydroelectric plants are common and can end up in the facility’s sump or in its water resource. Oil skimming cost-effectively removes the oil before the water is discharged into the environment.

Typically, the utility is charged with environmental stewardship of the adjacent reservoir or river that is vital to hydro power generation. Often the reservoir or river also provides a public recreation, and it may be a source for drinking water and irrigation. Hydraulic oil leaks cannot be tolerated.

Utilities may employ absorbents and other manual methods of oil skimming. These methods are messy and inefficient, and take maintenance personnel away from more important work. In contrast, Abanaki oil skimmers are proven in thousands of applications to be the lowest maintenance and most reliable means of oil removal.

Oil Grabber® Model 8 Oil Skimmer

The Oil Grabber® Model 8 oil skimmer is a dependable and cost-effective tool for removing oil from sumps in hydroelectric plants. With its rugged construction it is made to last many years with little or no maintenance. The Model 8 oil skimmer utilizes continuous belt and wipers to remove oil from existing sumps. With its specially designed belts, it can collect virtually all oils present in sumps, and with the optional oil concentrator it can virtually eliminate any residual water that may be picked up.

Oil skimming makes use of the differences in specific gravity and surface tension between oil and water. These physical characteristics allow the belt skimmer to attract oil and other hydrocarbon liquids from the surface of the fluid. The Model 8 can be used in tanks with depths as shallow as one foot, or as deep as 100 feet.

The Model 8 Oil Skimmer may be part of an emergency oil spill system, in which wastewater flows through a coalescer tank, is skimmed, and then passes though filters. These systems satisfy the requirements of government standards intended to prevent oil spills from entering the environment. Abanaki has experience in designing and installing complete emergency oil spill systems for the power generation industry.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Abanaki Model 8 Belt Skimmer in Operation

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Topics: industrial oil Skimmers, Model 8 Belt Skimmer, industrial wastewater

Belt Oil Skimmers are Made for Groundwater Remediation | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 24, 2021 2:53:20 PM

Sometimes, an important technological advance begins with a small step-back! Such is the case with remediation of hydrocarbons from groundwater utilizing existing recovery and monitoring wells.

For the past few years, state government has based decisions on the amount of clean up that they require by the risk posed to the environment. Risk Based Corrective Action, commonly called “Rebecca” (RBCA), is a process that utilizes the principles of exposure assessment, toxicity and mobility to make corrective action decisions on sites that are cost effective while still protecting human health as well as that of the environment. Many times, all they require is removal of the free-phase product, allowing any emulsified contaminant to degrade with time. RBCA has saved many millions of dollars both for taxpayers and for businesses. With state regulatory agencies taking this approach, oil skimming devices have emerged as one of the most cost-effective groundwater remediation equipment choices.

Oil Skimmer is the Solution in Groundwater Remediation

Wastewater engineers in industrial settings have, for many years, understood the value of oil skimmers in the removal of hydrocarbons from water. Food processing plants, the metals industry, machining firms and utilities have all used oil skimmers with great success for wastewater treatment. Recently, oil skimmer manufacturers have modified their product as groundwater remediation equipment. The belt oil skimmer’s ability to get into tight spaces and remove relatively large amounts of hydrocarbons lends itself perfectly to groundwater remediation.

Since most oils, fuels and other hydrocarbon liquids have the tendency to float on water, oil skimmers are designed to remove only the top, free-phase, product layer. With only product being removed, the cost and maintenance of other down-well and water treatment equipment can be eliminated. Another cost advantage to oil skimming is that in many cases the product can be salvaged for reuse – further reducing the overall price by eliminating the disposal cost.

Belt Oil Skimmers are the Most Cost-Effective Method

The options for remediation equipment through recovery wells are practically unlimited since these wells come in a variety of sizes; any of the available technologies such as pump and treat of bio-remediation can be used in the correct size recovery well. Monitoring wells, however, are small, typically less than 4 inches in diameter. Initially installed for the monitoring of groundwater they are cheaper to construct and just large enough to allow a baling device or oil/water interface detector to pass through. As a cost savings measure, these small diameter wells are increasingly being used for product removal. With the increase in this new use, it is only natural that a number of devices are showing up claiming the ability to remove product through monitoring wells.

With the requirements for groundwater remediation systems becoming more reasonable, the use of skimming devices in lieu of pump and treat systems is increasing. The enormous expense involved with treating millions of gallons of water including the remediation equipment, monitoring and related maintenance is being replaced with a much more common-sense attitude. Oil skimmers, especially belt oil skimmers, as a means of remediation equipment, not only meet the challenge but, most times exceed. Pump and treat still has a place in this industry, but the small step “backward” to time proven skimming, a more reasonable and cost-effective method, cannot be overlooked.



To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com



How Does a Well Oil Skimmer Work? 

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Topics: groundwater remediation, belt oil skimmer, well oil skimmer

Are Oil Skimmers in your Machine Shop? | Abanaki

Posted by Tom Hobson on Apr 30, 2021 9:15:00 AM

Tramp oil got you down? Is your product quality being affected by floating oil? Have you asked yourself how you remove oil from water effectively and efficiently?

Coolant Maintenance

Coolant maintenance should always be a top priority in shops. Dirty machine coolant can cause a multitude of problems for manufacturing facilities and CNC machines. Not using clean coolant can cause health issues in the workplace, reduce the life of the equipment used, and can significantly slow a process down. All of these factors lead to loss in production which leads to loss in profit for companies. And while recycling steel, aluminum, paper, and glass is readily accessible, recycling coolant is not. Additionally, the cost of recycling used coolant can be very expensive.

Coolant Skimmers Help Reduce Costs for Machine Shops

Coolant skimmers typically don’t come attached to CNC machines when they are newly bought. This is because nobody wants to admit that the brand-new machine is eventually going to leak oil into the coolant. This looks good on paper, but there is a reason why so many coolant skimmers are bought annually. CNC machines are bound to have at least a small amount of oil leaking into the coolant at some point. The skimmer will remove this oil from the top of the coolant for disposal. Without some type of coolant skimmer, the coolant life will be dramatically decreased. These small coolant skimmers will save you money throughout the operational life of your CNC machine.

Coolant skimmers help machine shops extend the life of their coolant by removing free floating oils. In today’s economic conditions every company is trying to look at ways to reduce costs and increase efficiency. Coolant can be a major expense but is a necessary evil. Abanaki offers a complete line of coolant maintenance products that go beyond coolant skimmers to offer various solutions for other coolant problems. The coolant maintenance line addresses concerns about coolant life as well as that rotten egg smell and small spills. If you have coolant in your machine shop, you need a coolant skimmer. See our full line of coolant skimmers here.


To learn more about oil skimmers, please contact our experts at 440-543-7400 or visit our website: www.abanaki.com


Abanaki has a new reference that can help you choose the right skimmer and the right size to ensure years of worry-free operation.

Click button below to access our “How to Successfully Implement Oil Skimmers” webinar to learn how to get the most out of your skimmer.

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Topics: coolant maintenance, coolant skimmer

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